Elementary


The Elementary curriculum is rooted in the Waldorf, Montessori and Shambhala tradition. It is a nonsectarian, contemplative education informed by modern educational, psychology and mindfulness research. The curriculum integrates the skill-mastery techniques of traditional western education, independent project learning, integrated thematic projects, and the multicultural emphasis of the United Nations School. When woven together they nurture the child’s individual growth while introducing them to the wealth of their human heritage.

 

At each developmental stage children experience the world in a new way. When this physical and mental development is mirrored in the stories and experiences of the curriculum children see their own experience as part of the bigger world, part of the human journey. This self-awareness makes it possible for them to meet the challenges they encounter and to master learning to its fullest. In this way, a direct relationship to the world is encouraged, allowing each child’s innate wisdom and confidence to shine.

 

World’s Cultural Traditions

At the heart of the school’s approach is the Shambhala view that fundamental human decency and dignity, courage and compassion are inherent in all people. We believe the children are best nurtured when they see their own strengths and struggles reflected in diverse cultures that reflect human greatness in many nationalities, races and religions. At every grade level, students are immersed in stories, songs, drama and games from around the world. These hands-on activities give them a genuine experience and appreciation for the many cultures and traditions in our world.

 

Rhythms and cycles

Rhythms and cycles are a constant part of nature and human life. The classroom routine works in harmony with daily, monthly and seasonal rhythms. Displays, stories, songs, paintings and activities such as gardening, building, candle dipping and cooking enrich the experience of the seasons. As well, festivals provide an opportunity for parents, friends and the larger community to join in celebrating the students’ work.